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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


I had this post saved to notepad when the servers went down. Unfortunately, I didn't save the posts I was replying to.

Taternut, thank you for clarifying the meaning behind your use of 'philosophizing.' Now in response to your statement:

Taternut said:

The number one skill possessed by every human being who ever lived is self-deception. That's what the ego is for. Keep that in mind as you philosophize.

Yes, self-deception is all too common. I make every attempt to look at all sides and use logic to form my opinions, rather than getting stuck in any beliefs that might be incorrect and hinder my search for truth.

While I don't believe in a greater power or an afterlife, I also do not believe they are nonexistent. Since there is no way of knowing one way or the other, I have no logical reason to believe one way or the other. When I say, "I don't believe in _____," and there is no evidence, it doesn't necessarily mean that I believe it doesn't exist; it simply means that I don't own that belief. Similarly, I don't need to believe I exist to know I exist, because there is too much overwhelming evidence of my existence for me to deduce otherwise.

Glad to meet someone who knows these words transcend language.

Likewise, Taternut! emoticon


Taternut said:

Neither religion nor lack of it fosters bad behavior. Gods don't kill people, people kill people.

I agree with both statements. However, self-deception and certain leaders will cause some people to believe that God wants them to kill people. Guns don't kill people either, but they are a very effective tool for achieving that goal.

--------------------------------

Notation added due to a post that was lost in the outage: Ahlyssah gave an example of Scientologists, formerly referred to as "Christian Scientists," who will pray to God when their children are gravely ill, instead of taking them to the hospital. Sometimes not taking them to the doctor has serious permanent effects, up to and including death. She then gave an example of someone sitting in a burning building, praying to God to put the fire out, instead of running for the nearest exit.

Ahlyssah, Scientologists are excellent examples of having an unhealthy excess of faith. People need medical care from time to time, just like plants need to be watered to survive through a drought.

I don't know if we could really know for sure if the authors of the biblical stories meant for them to be taken figuratively or literally, but I like your metaphorical interpretations. It's just too bad they had God playing favorites with whole societies, instead of rewarding or punishing individuals based on their own merits.

Yes, the Bible is sorely outdated. Why do we need to fear Hell when we can fear high-security prisons? I also think the antiquity of the biblical stories contributes a lot to the misunderstanding of them. If we could go back in time and understand what the authors experienced in their day, it would help us to better understand the intent of the stories they wrote.

How did you turn out so well-adjusted with a father who hates the English and doesn't even mention the Nazis? I really have to hand it to you for turning out so well. emoticon

I myself am a mixture of various European races with about 1/16 Cherokee and 1/16 Apache thrown in for good measure, and I hate what my white ancestors did to my native descendants. I don't hold today's whites accountable for it, of course, and I realize that I wouldn't be here (at least not in this body, if there are such things as souls) if that hadn't happened, but that doesn't make it right, and history is unfortunately repeating itself elsewhere in the world as we speak.

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15/Jan/06, 0:17 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


in responce to your question several posts back Lesigner Girl, I think that the problems stem from both current and past ethnocentric ideas. I'm a history major so this could go on for awhile; I will try to keep it short but....

The United States was founded by both religious people and people out to make a buck. These people brought over the idea of what was basically English superiority. These people looked at Native Americans and Africans as inferior because they were darker skinned and in the religious sence because they did not believe in the "one God" or Jesus. This bias was passes on to subsequent generations causing the rise of slavery. While slavery is not unusual in history, the version of slavery that was found in America was unique because it was based solely on race. During the time period when slavery was still practiced the traditions and actions of many of the slaves frightened the whites and other slave owners because there was always the fear of a slave rebelion. This fear continued after the Civil War was over and the slaves were freed. The idea of another culture mixing with the European culture already that was already established. This helped to formulate the isolationist policies that froze emmigration from most Non-European countries. Even today the fear of "contamination" seems to exist, ironically enough, in a country that is supposed to value diversity.

If this seemed like a long winded rant I'm sorry. I really did try to cut it back.

Back to somewhat on topic...

Yes, the Bible is sorely outdated. Why do we need to fear Hell when we can fear high-security prisons? I also think the antiquity of the biblical stories contributes a lot to the misunderstanding of them. If we could go back in time and understand what the authors experienced in their day, it would help us to better understand the intent of the stories they wrote.



Yippeee...I love the part about understanding the time period to interpret the text. That is absolutely correct. The other problem is that the bible has been translated several times. While most translations tend to be accurate sometimes the translation is correct but the meaning is wrong. For example the Greek language has/used to have (I'm not sure if it still does) three forms of the word love. Each meant "love" but a different kind of love. When the word was translated, the translator accurately translated these words as "love" but the variations and the meaning was slightly altered. This has likely caused hundreds of mis-interpretations of biblical passages, not because the person read it wrong, but because the passage was wrong.
20/Jan/06, 7:13 Link to this post Email   PM 
 
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


Hi Draggoness. I agree with every opinion you just posted, and your description of history is on par with everything I've learned over the years.

Going back to my original question:

Draggoness wrote:

That was an interesting article. I agree that some extremitst religions can be blamed for the increase in violence and teenage pregnancy. However, religion is not the only thing that is causing these problems.

The United States has several cultural problems that create the increased violence, pregnancy, etc.
1) In the United States we tend to see things that we don't understand as a threat. (religions, cultures, etc.) This causes hostilities between both US citizens and other countries.

2)We are arrogant. The US is right and everyone else is wrong. Do I need to explain this statement. We will FORCE people to be free.

3)Act first think later seems to be a theme with actions in America. I'll have sex now and worry about it later...gee I wonder what the consequence will be?


My response:

I agree that these are problems, although I would say #3 is more of a case of "act first, blame others for consequences later." But what do you suppose are the root of those problems, Draggoness?


Out of your last post as well as #1 in the original quote above, I gathered that ignorance (fear in the Africans whom they didn't understand) and religion (they were inferior because they didn't believe in the "one God" or Jesus) are two of the root causes for black slavery in America, and I agree with those assessments. You also state arrogance as a contributing factor to the world's problems (which I also agree with), but what do you suppose is the root cause of this arrogance? Also, why do you suppose people "act first think later?" I'm just trying to dig deeper into the possible causes instead of concentrating on the symptoms.

About the mistranslations of the Bible: I'm sure you're right about the original authors having multiple words that could translate into different definitions of "love." Likewise, I have read that one of their words could have multiple meanings in more modern languages. Combine this with their non-use of vowels, and a straight translation from their writings into English would still have a great probability of being mistranslated. So not only is the literal translation wrong, but how many people in our day would understand it even if it was translated correctly?

While proper translation is important to understanding what the Bible says, I am more interested in the experiences and beliefs of the authors that inspired them to write such stories. Many consider them God-inspired, while many consider them superstition-inspired. Did the authors really believe the Earth was flat and the sun, moon, and stars all rose and fell around it on a daily basis? Did they really believe that worms and spores from all over the world could make their way to Noah, and two of every animal in the world would actually fit in it, with enough food and manpower to keep them all from dying? And did they really believe a 450 ft long, 3-story boat made out of acacia wood would not have sank even on calm seas, and even without all those animals in it? Or is all this and more just a product of mistranslations of the original texts?

Thanks again for your response.

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20/Jan/06, 10:21 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?



Dragonness said:

The United States was founded by both religious people and people out to make a buck. These people brought over the idea of what was basically English superiority.

I forgot to mention a third group: those who left England to escape fascism and tyranny. Many of them were atheist or deist, and were persecuted for not conforming to the Christian beliefs of the English majority.

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21/Jan/06, 1:41 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?



Lesigner Girl wrote:

How did you turn out so well-adjusted with a father who hates the English and doesn't even mention the Nazis? I really have to hand it to you for turning out so well.



Simple: I hate my parents, and they return the favor, leaving me to develop on my own. emoticon Seriously though, my family is very hate-filled, to the point of absurdity. I learned at an early age that not everything adults tell me is true, and that it was up to me to learn about the world and all its components. The only downside is that I speculate a great deal, which pissed off many of my history teachers.


I'm sure you're right about the original authors having multiple words that could translate into different definitions of "love." Likewise, I have read that one of their words could have multiple meanings in more modern languages. Combine this with their non-use of vowels, and a straight translation from their writings into English would still have a great probability of being mistranslated. So not only is the literal translation wrong, but how many people in our day would understand it even if it was translated correctly?

While proper translation is important to understanding what the Bible says, I am more interested in the experiences and beliefs of the authors that inspired them to write such stories.



This is something I've brought up before: the Bible really cannot be trusted. There are just so many ways for the translation to go awry. For one thing, there are many words that sound similar but mean utterly different things. For example, "meat" and "meet"; one refers to the flesh of animals, and the other is a greeting between individuals. Had I not been speaking this language all my life, I would easily get mixed up between the two. Then you have words that have two different meanings, like "resolved". On one hand, it means that a solution has been found to a problem, and on the other it means that one's mind has been made up.

After that, we have to worry about deliberate misinterpretations at the hands of the scribes. For all we know, it could have been Adam who broke the rules and ate from the Tree of Knowledge. We just don't know what was added, what was embellished, and what was removed. By now, the Bible could be like a game of Telephone; the current message is completely different from the original. In the face of all this doubt, I really believe that it is up to the individual to make up his or her mind about how to interpret the Bible.

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Let's see if we can't get to the truth of the matter, hmm?

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Hi Ahlyssah,

It's sad that you grew up in such a hate-filled family, and I'm glad you found your own way without following their lead. Speculation might not be such a downside in history class, since the textbooks never seem to tell the full story. Thanks to your open-mindedness, you are able to pursue the truth today, instead of taking everything you were taught growing up at face value. :)

I like your analogy of the telephone game, although the end product of the telephone game would probably be more accurate than even the written translations of the Bible, not to mention the stories that seem to have been told by word of mouth before they were ever written down.

The scholarly theory of multiple writers spanning hundreds of years with a redactor putting them all together, editing, and adding to the text, is the one that seems most feasible to me. Combine this with the picking and choosing of which stories actually made it into the Bibles of the various Abrahamic religions and denominations (some containing more books than others), and parallel stories (for example, Gilgamesh) told by non-Abrahamic cultures, then the whole Bible seems more to me like a collection of legends and old wives' tales than anything else.

I don't mean to say that the Bible has no historical significance. On the contrary, if we could determine without a doubt, which story was written during which time period and what each author was trying to say, it can give us some insight into the thoughts, beliefs, and motives of the people who wrote the stories.

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23/Jan/06, 2:19 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Well here we go, I will try to answer the question about where the arrogance came from. The colonist who setteled in America had to scratch a living out of nothing, fight off (atleast in their opinion) hostile natives, make do without the basic necessities, etc. The fact that they did this with little to no help from England made the settler cocky and very sure of themselves. This is what gave them the arrogance to challenge the most powerful nation on earth at the time. The arrogance was repeated in the War of 1812 when the United States callenged England again. This arrogance stemed initially (in my opinion) from the overcoming of the challenges of beginning a new life. This arrogance was passed down from generation to generation and with each success the United States has it becomes more and more pronounced.

Another factor that can't be over looked is the religious aspect of particularly New England. The people who settled in the area were convinced that they were "God's Chosen Ones" That they were right to take the territory because it was God's will, they were right to persecute those who's beliefs were not the same as the majority. The arrogance was bred out of religious zeal. It lead to the idea of Manifest Destiny which is the reason why we moved Native Americans off of their land by force and pushed them into reservations.

The religious zeal, in all fareness, is not strictly a U.S. invention. However any act that is commited "in the name of God" carries with it an inherent arrogance. The act itselfs suggests that the people committing the act know exactally what God's will is. This arrogance has lead to the Crusades, the Spanish Inquisition, the attack on Sept. 11 and other horrible crimes.

I think that I covered everything...if not let me know.
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


Hi Draggoness!

That definitely seems to be the best explanation for arrogance in America, as well as some of the arrogance that people in other countries have. Thank you for that insightful answer!

Do you have any idea as to why people "act now think later"? Do you think that could be chalked up to simple ignorance? Parenting? Society?

Thanks again! emoticon

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I think that it is a circular problem. The original reason was probably bred out of arrogance. As to why that idea is still around, I honestly couldn't say. My best guess is that so far there has not been a serious enough consequence for actions of authority figures who haven't thought out their actions. The only excuse that is used is "well their only human" not what it should be "They really didn't think out their actions."
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Thank you for your response, Draggoness.

At this point I would probably have to say ignorance, arrogance, parenting, society, the media, and faith could all be factors, some factors playing more or less of a part in each individual case.

I was just reading the abortion thread in here, which makes good points concerning the "act first think later" mentality. A lot of times, parents don't take the time to teach their children things they need to know, many times the parents don't even know the facts to themselves.

Arrogance comes in when someone is taught something, but they think they will somehow bypass the consequences.

Society letting authority figures off easy, like you said, chalking it up to, "We're all human and we all make mistakes," even when they knew better and didn't care that what they were doing was wrong. Then there are tv and movies where people get shot without blood, the coyote always comes back after being blown up or having an anvil dropped on his head, etc.

I think false beliefs can also play a part in the act now think later mentality. Believing in fate or God's will can lead some people to think "Why bother? Everything is pre-destined anyway," or "If it is God's will, then so be it." Religion also comes into play when religiously-based groups try to dictate what children will be taught in schools. For example, abstinence-only programs that don't teach kids how to protect themselves if they don't choose abstinence.

There are probably other reasons, but these are all the ideas I can come up with at the moment.

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26/Jan/06, 8:56 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Bing-go

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There are things which Man can not understand. For everything else, there's a lie.

Let's see if we can't get to the truth of the matter, hmm?

'Lyssa was here . . . and she'll be back
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If these are the root causes, then what are our solutions to the "act now think later" mentality? Obviously, it would help to make authority figures accountable for their actions, and good parenting can counteract the fiction that kids see in TV and movies. But how do we get the parents to do this, as well as teach their kids that they are ultimately responsible for their own actions and the consequences of those actions? What about those who believe everything that happens is "God's Will"? How do we get those people to accept accountability? Also, how do we enable schools to teach our children the information they so crucially need to act wisely, when so many parents fight against it?

Would teaching accountability also get rid of some of the arrogance in our world?

As for ignorance, how can we spread knowledge to those who don't know to seek it out? For example, so many people think that watching the evening news is enough...

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Lesigner Girl wrote:

What about those who believe everything that happens is "God's Will"? How do we get those people to accept accountability?



Simple: we break into their homes, take their children away to live with gay couples, and say in response to their entreaties, "God sent us." emoticon

On a serious note (hey, it seemed like a good joke at the time), I think we can seriously reduce the amount of arrogance and intolerance by simply integrating the whole of society. This means no more Catholic schools, no more single-sex schools. We would put a true ban (not just a few ads on TV) on racial discrimination of all kinds, work, housing, and wages to name a few, and why not put it in the Constitutions of all Western countries? Then wed have to attack class: no more yuppie schools built for yuppie families, we'll add some lower- and and middle-income housing to the area so that the little rich pricks are exposed to different types of people from the beginning. It would take a generation or two, but I think just breaking the barriers and ending the tradition of ignorance would eventually come close to ending the madness.

---
There are things which Man can not understand. For everything else, there's a lie.

Let's see if we can't get to the truth of the matter, hmm?

'Lyssa was here . . . and she'll be back
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As a History Major my opinion is slightly biased however I believe that is schools quit sugar-coating history then alot of these problems could be solved. I know that up until around third of fourth grade it was always portrayed that the American Colonists were the "good guys" and that the Native Americans were the "bad guys" imagine the shock when students are, if ever, given a clear picture of what happened and exactally how horrible a past, what ever the country, can be. By not sugar-coating history a lot of the flaws in any countries past can put a damper on the arrogance and ignorance that seem to be running unchecked.
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Yeah, up until seventh grade we're taught that Columbus was a hero who did a noble deed, even if by accident (we later discovered that he was responsible for the genocide of the Taino people, and died in a prison cell for his crimes). They tell us about the First Thanksgiving, during which the slighty stupid but thoughtful "Indians" gave the settlers food during their time of need (which, we learned in years following, probably never actually happened, and that the only "gifts" given by the natives were taken by force by relentlessly intolerant, power-crazed white devils).

In addition to that, we have a black history month, which just seems so hypocritically racist to me. What, are black people different from white people that we can't even afford to mention their history alongside our own? Most black history events take place during the same time frame as white history events, but instead of just covering both sides in the same history lecture, we have to differentiate. This gives the impression that both sides are different, and we all know that is not true.

A problem with history is that nobody wants to ackownledge the negative aspects of one's country and/or culture. This causes a lot of important details to be hidden from public view, and people begin to forget, and do not heed the warning signs that history is about to repeat itself. Trust me, if anyone remembered the McCarthy era, Bush would have been kicked out by now.

---
There are things which Man can not understand. For everything else, there's a lie.

Let's see if we can't get to the truth of the matter, hmm?

'Lyssa was here . . . and she'll be back
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Ahlyssah said:

Simple: we break into their homes, take their children away to live with gay couples, and say in response to their entreaties, "God sent us."

I know you meant this as a joke, but I think it makes a good point. People use "God told me to do it" all the time, so why can't we? emoticon

You both have some very good ideas, and they all seem to relate to educating people. If the different classes, races, religions, genders, etc., were all integrated, we would all be more informed about each other. If history books and classes stopped candy-coating history, our children would be informed about some of the inhumane things we have done, and "the other guys" would no longer be considered the aggressor. Even if someone were forced to let loving gay couples watch their children, they could grow to like these people and start to ask themselves why they hated them in the first place.

I guess it's probably a good thing that I wasn't very good at (candy-coated) history when I was in school, lol, since I didn't have those beliefs ingrained in me from my childhood. Sure, I remembered the general themes: Columbus, pilgrims, slavery/Lincoln, Salem witch trials, etc., but I couldn't remember dates or the lesser-known presidents, etc. Back then, I didn't see much need for me to know the stuff since I had no desire to pursue a political career, so what good would it do me to know it? But years later, after I started to learn the real history that we weren't told in school, it only made me want to know more, and to tell others about it, because we are seeing history repeat itself over and over again through people's ignorance, and I think that knowledge can help to end the cycle.

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3/Feb/06, 10:39 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Religion says that it's okay to murder as many people as you wish, as long as your intention is justfied.

Religion tells us that WE are right, and THEY are wrong, and if they don't want to accept this fact, that it is our job to teach them otherwise and wipe them from the globe.

Since when?

If you look at all the states that were godless(Soviet Union & Nazi Germany top of the list)these states committed genocide on a massive scale.Our culture is also becoming godless and that makes it fertile ground for a dictatorship.

It also has begun its own genocide;abortion and euthanasia.

States that were godless fostered genocide,dictatorships,evil we couldn't imagine.

GB!~
p4p


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Hi p4p! emoticon

If you look at all the states that were godless(Soviet Union & Nazi Germany top of the list)


Hitler was a Catholic.


Our culture is also becoming godless and that makes it fertile ground for a dictatorship.


George W Bush apparently believes "God" speaks through him, and he is about as fascist as one can be in a "free" country such as ours.

I will, however, agree that Hitler was, and Bush is, most likely godless, because it is my observation and deduction that the universe is most likely godless.  Even so, Hitler and Bush have both committed atrocities and taken away liberties in the name of the Christian "God," and they are only two out of countless dictators that have done so.  This doesn't necessarily mean that the leaders believe in the "God" they claim to speak for, but billions of people have followed them in the name of "God" for centuries.  Before YWHW/God/Allah and still today, people have believed in other gods, and although I have never heard of a violent Pagan group in this day and age, when Christians are burning down family planning clinics and persecuting people because they were born with or without certain qualities, there were plenty of Pagans back in ancient times committing the same atrocities in the name of their gods, as Christians have committed over the past two millenia.  Why have the Pagans stopped, while Christians continue?  Perhaps because the ancient religions have outgrown it, while the Christians still have a lot to learn.  And no, I am not a Pagan, because that would require a belief in deities.

It is not my position that religion causes people to be bad or good.  It is my position that religion can bring out the bad and good that already exists in anybody.  People will join a church that suits them, and when their "brethren" support their darkest desires, they will be more likely to follow through with them.


It also has begun its own genocide; ... and euthanasia.


I posted a personal story on May 5 concerning euthanasia over at my Temple of Illusia board, which I will re-post here:

In the last years of my grandmother's life, she suffered from Alzheimer's and dimentia.

It was her wish to not be hooked up to feeding tubes or life support, so while she was on her deathbed in the last weeks of her life, all we could do was sit around and wait, while she went from plump, to thin, to skeleton-like.

In her final weeks she slept constantly, seemingly unaware of her surroundings. Occasionally there would be an outburst, "ma ma ma ma!" before she went silent again. She became severely dehydrated, thick layers of skin peeling off her tongue. If she was aware, it had to be painful. Phlegm would build up, gurgling in the back of her throat, and my uncle would suction it out to keep her from drowning in it. I wondered to myself, why prolong her agony, in case she does feel anything?

I thought about putting a pillow over her face to end her needless suffering. Her quality of life was gone, and she was only going to get worse before her body would completely shut down forever.

That last night, we were sitting around my grandmother – my uncle, myself, and my grandmother's nurse. My grandmother started heaving, so silently that the other two didn't notice at first, and I pointed it out. The nurse quietly said, "It's time."

I quickly woke up some of my aunts and uncles and they woke up the others. I went back to my grandmother, where the family had gathered around. I went to the side of her bed, put her hand in mine, and then she breathed her last breath. A feeling of peace came over me. Now her suffering was over. I didn't want to lose her, but I wanted even less for her to suffer.

This is why I support legalized euthanasia, for cases like this one.

Do you support euthanasia? Why or why not?


It's only received a couple of responses, but if you want to read them, here is the original thread.


Last edited by:
Lesigner Girl, 19/Jun/06, 11:50


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19/Jun/06, 11:10 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
C Berenice Profile
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


Any belief - Christian or "Pagan", good or bad, has its passionate followers. Passionate followers get blinded by their belief and would justify any action when / if called or, rather, think they are called - to defend it. "Christians" specifically, for all their pacifist preaching, have been guilty of atrocities in the name of Christ that would make Christ weep! Hitler was a good example as was Bush; so is the KKK, just to name these few!... Killing, burning, destroying ... all in the name of Christ!!!!!..... emoticon

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24/Jun/06, 8:04 Link to this post PM 
 
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


I would say that's a good summary, C Berenice. emoticon

I'm not so sure we should be generalizing about all passionate followers, though.  Loud G seems to be a pretty passionate follower, but I don't picture him planting bombs at family planning clinics or otherwise threatening the patients and doctors there. emoticon

Granted, it's difficult coming up with the right adjective for the type of people we're referring to.  I tend to use the word "extremist" rather than passionate myself (albeit loosely), but that word doesn't seem quite right either, because it's too close to "extreme."  I had a friend back in middle school who I considered extreme.  After she started going to her Pentecostal church, she wouldn't cut her hair, wouldn't listen to any music that wasn't praising God or Jesus, wouldn't watch soaps or anything else that might have cursing or "smut" in it, wouldn't wear jewelry or any hair accessories that remotely resembled jewelry, would only wear long dresses or skirts (no pants or shorts, which could "tempt" guys), probably fasted about once a week, etc.  Before she converted, she used to curse, wear makeup and shorts... basically she was a typical middle-schooler until then.

The spoken language can be so limiting at times. emoticon

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30/Jun/06, 6:51 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Lesigner Girl wrote:I'm not so sure we should be generalizing about all passionate followers, though....


I didn't mean it to sound as a generalization... I stand corrected for I should have been more clear. Of course we don't /can't generalize. Extremist is by far a better word; allow me to insist, however that it does take passion to become an "extremist". emoticon

Granted, it's difficult coming up with the right adjective for the type of people we're referring to...


You know...you got me thinking....! These people can't be described with just one word simply because it all depends on who the people are who perform such acts.
A mob can perform hatefull acts in the name of Christ but a mob can go nowhere with out a leader. So the word here could be .."misguided" because the responsibility lies with the mobs leader/instigator. Now, the reasons that have guided that leader into instigating any visious act can be many. All of them wrong! Money, political control, fear...take your peak. Therefore the word "passionate" could only apply to the people who follow that leader out of extreme love and zeal! ......
Under this light then, I would say that your friend was not an extremist but rather a passionate follower of an extremist belief because that is what they were teaching her to do in her church!


The spoken language can be so limiting at times.

Weeeell...I could teach you Greek??? Jokes aside, thank you for pointing out my somewhat rush choice of word in such a gentle manner! emoticon

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30/Jun/06, 10:21 Link to this post PM 
 
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You're welcome, C Berenice. emoticon  Somehow I knew you didn't mean to generalize, but there could be a passionate follower or two out there who might think otherwise, and I thought I'd give you an excuse to clarify before one showed up to protest. emoticon

You're right that one adjective will never cover an entire group, and I think your examples as to why that is are excellent ones. emoticon

So... are you saying that the Greek language isn't as limiting as English?  I only know one Greek phrase myself, although I don't think it would be appropriate to post here even if I could spell it. emoticon

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7/Jul/06, 9:06 Link to this post Email   PM  Blog
 
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Re: Does religion foster bad behavior?


It certainly seems to foster bad behavior. How many times have leaders of different countries declared a HOLY war? or maybe they might try to use religion or the bible or some other words that have been written down in some long forgotten and obsolete set of rules that they use to justify crushing other cultures or groups of people?


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21/Sep/09, 3:41 Link to this post Email   PM 
 


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